"What is a slackline?" / "What is slacklining" / "Why would you do it?" / "Where did it come from?"




Answers:

Where did the tradition of cricket caps start like the baggy green and other countries?

The premise of slacklining is that it is a fun balancing activity. It's easy enough to learn, loads of fun and has lots of nice physical benefits. It is a lot like tight rope walking but is almost always done close to the ground and the line is bouncy and to the observer looks like a rope with slack in it. In reality it's springy webbing set tightly between two points and it stretches once your on it, but the concept is the same, but it feels a lot different than rope.
A typical slackline setup is consists of a line of webbing (usually tubular 1" nylon) pulled tight between two upright and sturdy objects, preferably trees but telephone poles and vehicles are frequently used as well. There are lots of variations on how to get the line tight and some creative minds have found interesting ways of setting up slacklines without trees as well. The basic idea is walking it like a tight rope. It behaves differently since the nylon webbing stretches and bounces under the slacker's weight and has a very "live" feel.
Besides being incredibly fun, walking on webbing was used for a new type of concentration and balance exercise. Some people use it for meditation or to bring their balance and concentration to a new level for performance in sports. Others just find it relaxing yet exhilarating as a sport it itself. Most importantly though, it was for fun. The sport has evolved a lot since the beginning of just a handful of slackers being in the loop to lines popping up around campfires and climbing gyms across the world. Our goal is to push it one step even further by introducing non-climbers to the sport as well.
Slacklining has its origins the rock climbing arena. For days off or evenings after a hard days climb, climbers in Yosemite Camp 4 were walking chains between posts just for fun as a balancing trick. Eventually someone came up with the idea of walking nylon webbing usually associated with climbing. It provided a more "live" feel and instead of being a static balancing act, it would bounce and recoil against your moves making for a really fun dynamic ride. That idea spawned into a sport of it's own and there are now slackers all over the world.

Why does Channel 9 consider Brett Lee an allrounder?

"Slackline is an art of dynamic balance."

The premise of slacklining is that it is a fun balancing activity. It's easy enough to learn, loads of fun and has lots of nice physical benefits. It is a lot like tight rope walking but is almost always done close to the ground and the line is bouncy and to the observer looks like a rope with slack in it. In reality it's springy webbing set tightly between two points and it stretches once your on it, but the concept is the same, but it feels a lot different than rope.

A typical slackline setup is consists of a line of webbing (usually tubular 1" nylon) pulled tight between two upright and sturdy objects, preferably trees but telephone poles and vehicles are frequently used as well. There are lots of variations on how to get the line tight and some creative minds have found interesting ways of setting up slacklines without trees as well. The basic idea is walking it like a tight rope. It behaves differently since the nylon webbing stretches and bounces under the slacker's weight and has a very "live" feel.

Besides being incredibly fun, walking on webbing was used for a new type of concentration and balance exercise. Some people use it for meditation or to bring their balance and concentration to a new level for performance in sports. Others just find it relaxing yet exhilarating as a sport it itself. Most importantly though, it was for fun. The sport has evolved a lot since the beginning of just a handful of slackers being in the loop to lines popping up around campfires and climbing gyms across the world. Our goal is to push it one step even further by introducing non-climbers to the sport as well.

Slacklining has its origins the rock climbing arena. For days off or evenings after a hard days climb, climbers in Yosemite Camp 4 were walking chains between posts just for fun as a balancing trick. Eventually someone came up with the idea of walking nylon webbing usually associated with climbing. It provided a more "live" feel and instead of being a static balancing act, it would bounce and recoil against your moves making for a really fun dynamic ride. That idea spawned into a sport of it's own and there are now slackers all over the world.

The sport is strongly linked to rock climbing but it is starting to grow to include non-climbers as well.

Prepare a cricket 16 member squad by taking one player each from all the 16 teams playing this world cup?

Slacklining is a balance sport which utilizes tubular nylon webbing stretched tight between two anchor points. Slacklining is distinct from tightrope walking in that the line is not held rigidly taut; it is instead dynamic, stretching and bouncing like a large rubber band. The line's tension can be adjusted to suit the user. The line itself is flat, due to the nature of webbing, thus keeping the slacker's footing from rolling as would be the case with an ordinary rope. The dynamic nature of the line allows for impressive tricks and stunts.


Slacklining is a balance sport which utilizes tubular nylon webbing stretched tight between two anchor points. Slacklining is distinct from tightrope walking in that the line is not held rigidly taut; it is instead dynamic, stretching and bouncing like a large rubber band. The line's tension can be adjusted to suit the user. The line itself is flat, due to the nature of webbing, thus keeping the slacker's footing from rolling as would be the case with an ordinary rope. The dynamic nature of the line allows for impressive tricks and stunts


This is from the official website.
The premise of slacklining is that it is a fun balancing activity. It's easy enough to learn, loads of fun and has lots of nice physical benefits. It is a lot like tight rope walking but is almost always done close to the ground and the line is bouncy and to the observer looks like a rope with slack in it. In reality it's springy webbing set tightly between two points and it stretches once your on it, but the concept is the same, but it feels a lot different than rope.

A typical slackline setup is consists of a line of webbing (usually tubular 1" nylon) pulled tight between two upright and sturdy objects, preferably trees but telephone poles and vehicles are frequently used as well. There are lots of variations on how to get the line tight and some creative minds have found interesting ways of setting up slacklines without trees as well. The basic idea is walking it like a tight rope. It behaves differently since the nylon webbing stretches and bounces under the slacker's weight and has a very "live" feel.

Besides being incredibly fun, walking on webbing was used for a new type of concentration and balance exercise. Some people use it for meditation or to bring their balance and concentration to a new level for performance in sports. Others just find it relaxing yet exhilarating as a sport it itself. Most importantly though, it was for fun. The sport has evolved a lot since the beginning of just a handful of slackers being in the loop to lines popping up around campfires and climbing gyms across the world. Our goal is to push it one step even further by introducing non-climbers to the sport as well.

Slacklining has its origins the rock climbing arena. For days off or evenings after a hard days climb, climbers in Yosemite Camp 4 were walking chains between posts just for fun as a balancing trick. Eventually someone came up with the idea of walking nylon webbing usually associated with climbing. It provided a more "live" feel and instead of being a static balancing act, it would bounce and recoil against your moves making for a really fun dynamic ride. That idea spawned into a sport of it's own and there are now slackers all over the world.

The sport is strongly linked to rock climbing but it is starting to grow to include non-climbers as well.

For the most comprehensive history of slacklining that we've seen, see Scott Balcom's post on RockClimbing.com

Who do you think should be in the aussie world cup team from these two?

Mine is better

Slacklining is a balance sport which utilizes tubular nylon webbing stretched tight between two anchor points. Slacklining is distinct from tightrope walking in that the line is not held rigidly taut; it is instead dynamic, stretching and bouncing like a large rubber band. The line's tension can be adjusted to suit the user. The line itself is flat, due to the nature of webbing, thus keeping the slacker's footing from rolling as would be the case with an ordinary rope. The dynamic nature of the line allows for impressive tricks and stunts.


Slacklining is a balance sport which utilizes tubular nylon webbing stretched tight between two anchor points. Slacklining is distinct from tightrope walking in that the line is not held rigidly taut; it is instead dynamic, stretching and bouncing like a large rubber band. The line's tension can be adjusted to suit the user. The line itself is flat, due to the nature of webbing, thus keeping the slacker's footing from rolling as would be the case with an ordinary rope. The dynamic nature of the line allows for impressive tricks and stunts

A typical slackline setup is consists of a line of webbing (usually tubular 1" nylon) pulled tight between two upright and sturdy objects, preferably trees but telephone poles and vehicles are frequently used as well. There are lots of variations on how to get the line tight and some creative minds have found interesting ways of setting up slacklines without trees as well. The basic idea is walking it like a tight rope. It behaves differently since the nylon webbing stretches and bounces under the slacker's weight and has a very "live" feel.

Besides being incredibly fun, walking on webbing was used for a new type of concentration and balance exercise. Some people use it for meditation or to bring their balance and concentration to a new level for performance in sports. Others just find it relaxing yet exhilarating as a sport it itself. Most importantly though, it was for fun. The sport has evolved a lot since the beginning of just a handful of slackers being in the loop to lines popping up around campfires and climbing gyms across the world. Our goal is to push it one step even further by introducing non-climbers to the sport as well.

Slacklining has its origins the rock climbing arena. For days off or evenings after a hard days climb, climbers in Yosemite Camp 4 were walking chains between posts just for fun as a balancing trick. Eventually someone came up with the idea of walking nylon webbing usually associated with climbing. It provided a more "live" feel and instead of being a static balancing act, it would bounce and recoil against your moves making for a really fun dynamic ride. That idea spawned into a sport of it's own and there are now slackers all over the world.

The sport is strongly linked to rock climbing but it is starting to grow to include non-climbers as well.

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